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6.2 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL - TCP Connected: An Internet Encyclopedia
6.2 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL - TCP

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Next: 7. APPLICATION LAYER - ROUTING PROTOCOLS

6.2 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL - TCP

6.2 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL - TCP

The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is specified in [TRANS:2].

A router that implements TCP MUST be compliant, and SHOULD be unconditionally compliant, with the requirements of [INTRO:2], except that:

  • This specification does not specify the interfaces between the various protocol layers. Thus, a router need not comply with the following requirements of [INTRO:2] (except of course where compliance is required for proper functioning of Application Layer protocols supported by the router):

    Use of Push: RFC-793 Section 2.8:
    Passing a received PSH flag to the application layer is now OPTIONAL.

    Urgent Pointer: RFC-793 Section 3.1:
    A TCP MUST inform the application layer asynchronously whenever it receives an Urgent pointer and there was previously no pending urgent data, or whenever the Urgent pointer advances in the data stream. There MUST be a way for the application to learn how much urgent data remains to be read from the connection, or at least to determine whether or not more urgent data remains to be read.

    TCP Connection Failures:
    An application MUST be able to set the value for R2 for a particular connection. For example, an interactive application might set R2 to ``infinity,'' giving the user control over when to disconnect.

    TCP Multihoming:
    If an application on a multihomed host does not specify the local IP address when actively opening a TCP connection, then the TCP MUST ask the IP layer to select a local IP address before sending the (first) SYN. See the function GET_SRCADDR() in Section 3.4.

    IP Options:
    An application MUST be able to specify a source route when it actively opens a TCP connection, and this MUST take precedence over a source route received in a datagram.

  • For similar reasons, a router need not comply with any of the requirements of [INTRO:2].

  • The requirements concerning the Maximum Segment Size Option in [INTRO:2] are amended as follows: a router that implements the host portion of MTU discovery (discussed in Section [4.2.3.3] of this memo) uses 536 as the default value of SendMSS only if the path MTU is unknown; if the path MTU is known, the default value for SendMSS is the path MTU - 40.

  • The requirements concerning the Maximum Segment Size Option in [INTRO:2] are amended as follows: ICMP Destination Unreachable codes 11 and 12 are additional soft error conditions. Therefore, these message MUST NOT cause TCP to abort a connection.

DISCUSSION

It should particularly be noted that a TCP implementation in a router must conform to the following requirements of [INTRO:2]:

  • Providing a configurable TTL. [Time to Live: RFC-793 Section 3.9]

  • Providing an interface to configure keep-alive behavior, if keep-alives are used at all. [TCP Keep-Alives]

  • Providing an error reporting mechanism, and the ability to manage it. [Asynchronous Reports]

  • Specifying type of service. [Type-of-Service]

The general paradigm applied is that if a particular interface is visible outside the router, then all requirements for the interface must be followed. For example, if a router provides a telnet function, then it will be generating traffic, likely to be routed in the external networks. Therefore, it must be able to set the type of service correctly or else the telnet traffic may not get through.


Next: 7. APPLICATION LAYER - ROUTING PROTOCOLS

Connected: An Internet Encyclopedia
6.2 TRANSMISSION CONTROL PROTOCOL - TCP

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